50 per cent already sold at Broughton Court

Tue, 22 January

Broughton Court – a view of a spacious lounge opening on to the garden.

Buyers will need to act swiftly to secure one of the last remaining brand new homes built in an exclusively private enclave of just ten in the heart of rural Wiltshire.

The Broughton Court development off Newleaze Park in what has been described as the ‘timeless chocolate-box village’ of Broughton Gifford near Melksham has proved to be so popular that half of the homes already have been sold.

‘They have proved to be particularly popular with young couples who are first-time buyers,’ reports Terri Hayes-Pugh, Cotswold Homes’ sales and marketing director.

‘A community of successful young people has become established at Broughton Court but the opportunities to join them are becoming limited as the last few properties continue to attract buyers. My advice is simple: “Don’t dither; act now.”’

Some of the young buyers were living in rented accommodation, or at home with their parents, but when they visited the sales office on-site they discovered that they could afford a home of their own.

‘When we explained the availability of the Government’s Help-to-Buy scheme it made all the difference for some of those who were not sure if they could afford to buy,’ says Terri. ‘The scheme can help purchasers to buy with a deposit of just five per cent.’

Cotswold Homes provides additional help with its popular GameChanger package which, subject to terms and conditions, can assist with moving costs such as estate agency fees or by paying for carpets.

‘Broughton Gifford appeals to those wanting to escape the hustle and bustle of town or city living,’ says Terri. ‘Although the village is located in a relaxed rural setting with a 28-acre common with sheep, duck ponds, a cricket pitch and old village pub, it is only minutes away by car from the Waitrose and Sainsbury stores in Melksham.’

‘A community of successful young people has become established at Broughton Court but the opportunities to join them are becoming limited as the last few properties continue to attract buyers. My advice is simple: “Don’t dither; act now.”’